Many people consider their pets as family members. For some people in Pennsylvania, a pet may be their only family. Regardless of the situation, you may feel the need to leave money to your pet in your will, but you may not be sure if you can legally do this. This is tricky, but you may be able to do this.

Money explains that the tricky part is that the law sees your pet as property. It is not validated under the law as a living entity, like a child would be. So, whatever happens to your property after you die would happen to your pet. In most cases, that means it would go to a shelter if nobody stepped up to care for it. You can put things in place, though, to ensure the continued good care of your pet by including your pet in your will.

You cannot really leave money directly to your pet, but you can earmark it for use only in the care of y our pet. This requires naming a guardian for your pet. You should choose someone you trust and who is willing to take care of your pet after your death. You should leave enough money to reasonable assist with the care of your pet for the rest of its life. Make sure to consider all the costs of pet care, such as medical bills, food and grooming.

You can create a trust to put the money in to discourage improper use of it and help ensure it does go to caring for your pet. A trust gives you a little more control over the situation. This information is for education and is not legal advice.